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Call for Proposals: Art & Craft Instructional Videos

Bainbridge Island Museum of Art (BIMA) invites proposals from Puget Sound region visual artists and craftspeople to produce short, instructional videos for BIMA’s ongoing virtual program, Art in Action #BIMAfromHome.

Program Overview
BIMA has created over 70 videos to engage learners of all ages. These short video lessons explore techniques and concepts related to contemporary art and craft, with an emphasis on using materials easily accessible at home. Videos premiere and are archived  on BIMA’s Facebook and YouTube page. This library is accessed by individuals, families, and K-12 teachers in our region and beyond.

Opportunity
We are seeking artists to produce 1-5 videos for the Art in Action program (3-5 minutes each, in length), between February  and May 2021. Qualified applicants will  be experienced teaching artists (arts integration and social-emotional learning emphasis a plus). Artists must be comfortable teaching on camera and will negotiate either filming using their own video production equipment (smartphone or web camera) from home; or on-site with BIMA staff support and equipment.

Compensation
This project is supported by a Community Consortium grant from the Washington State Arts Commission (ArtsWA). Contracted artists will receive honoraria ($150 per video, up to $750 total) for their work, as well as publicity (in the form of hyperlinks to the artist’s website or social media) through BIMA’s social media channels.  An additional transportation stipend  is available for those traveling to BIMA for recording.

Proposals
Please email Emma Cantrell, School & Youth programs manager, emma@biartmuseum.org with the subject line “Art in Action Proposal”. Please include:

  1. Your resume, including teaching experience
  2. 5-10 Images of your work or website link
  3. A one page cover letter describing:
    1. Your experience with producing digital videos
    2. Your preference for producing videos from home (with your own equipment) or working with BIMA staff and equipment on-site.
    3. 3-5 ideas for video topics* related to your practice *Before drafting your proposal, please review BIMA’s library of videos, to ensure you are proposing topics that have not yet been made into videos for this series.

Preference will be given to proposals received by February 15.

Bainbridge Island Museum of Art is an equal opportunity employer. Individuals from all cultures and communities are encouraged to apply.

Watch Previous Art in Action Videos

Embracing the New Year: BIMA’s Winter/Spring Exhibitions

BIMA launches into this most unusual and unpredictable new year, partnering with several artists to embrace reality and relevance in these times. We kick off 2021 with a range of exhibitions addressing race equity and social justice, situational irony, reflections on nature, and even beauty for beauty’s sake.

Besides the COVID-19 pandemic, political disharmony, and economic turmoil for many, 2020 stands out as a pivotal year of reckoning in America. In response to relentless attacks on race equity and civil rights, BIMA presents Breathe. This group exhibition is inspired by the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Artists include Humaira Abid, Cory Bennett Anderson, Eileen Jimenez, Michelle Kumata, Marilyn Montufar, Susan Point, Roger Shimomura, Carletta Carrington Wilson, and Linda Wolf. The artists highlight historical and current injustices, and survival and hope, honoring Dr. King’s dreams—still far out of reach for so many.

Paul Rucker’s FOREVER series is displayed in part with thirteen new works in BIMA’s Permanent Art Collection.  In this powerful work, Rucker acknowledges civil rights martyrs that will probably never appear on US postage stamps. Included are Four Little Girls, victims of the 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, and Edwin T. Pratt, former Executive Director of the Seattle Urban League murdered in 1969 at his home. Both Breathe and FOREVER are part of BIMA’s Untold Stories series this winter.

Paul Rucker, Four Little Girls

Kimberly Trowbridge: Into the Garden is a large solo exhibition featuring a diverse, yet cohesive, body of paintings. The work reflects images, ideas, and methods developed over the past two years as a Creative Fellow at Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island.

Kimberly Trowbridge (Seattle), Sea of Ferns (Bloedel), 2019, oil on paper, 22 " x 30", Courtesy of the Artist, kimberlytrowbridge.com @kimberly_trowbridge

Water Is… is co-curated by Cynthia Sears, BIMA Founder, and Catherine Alice Michaelis.  This water-themed exhibition draws from the Cynthia Sears Collection of Artist’s Books. Artists include Amandine Nabarra-Piomelli and Shu-Ju Wang.

In later February, we open Nancy Callan and Katherine Gray: The Clown in Me Loves You. Callan and Gray have collaborated for over four years on this new series of glass sculptures. They combine Venetian glassblowing techniques with contemporary commentary on the roles of, and reactions to, clowns. Initially it all seems like light-hearted fun, but multiple layers of feelings and social realities emerge upon taking a closer look at these fascinating pieces.

Nancy Callan and Katherine Gray, The Dreamer, 2018, blown and sculpted glass with enamels, 13”h x 8”w x 8”d, Courtesy of the Artists

Trimpin: Hear & Now also opens in later February. Trimpin is an acclaimed artist, composer, and musician. He collaborated with student artists from Path With Art in Seattle to create this large-scale kinetic sound sculpture. The work incorporates an antique, hand-pulled wagon, originally built by Trimpin’s father in Germany. Hear & Now aims to reveal human experiences encompassed in homelessness. In Trimpin’s words, the piece is “a metaphor for being in constant transition.”

Trimpin: Hear & Now

While BIMA is temporarily closed due to COVID restrictions, we’re excited to bring ways for you to experience these exhibitions from afar until we can reopen our doors. Check our website calendar for upcoming exhibition-related events and join our email list to receive information about video and other digital content coming up.

Images (top to bottom):

Kimberly Trowbridge (Seattle), Camelia Walk III (detail), 2020, oil on linen on panel, 48″h x 96″w, Courtesy of Linda Hodges Gallery, kimberlytrowbridge.com

Michelle Kumata (Seattle), Resilience, 2019, acrylic on paper, 11”h x 14”w, Collection of the Artist, michellekumata.com, @michellekumata

Paul Rucker, Four Little Girls, Fujicolor Crystal Archive emulsion sealed between solid recycled aluminum and a high-gloss UV protective laminate, 40″h x 30″w each, Edition of 18, BIMA Permanent Art Collection

Kimberly Trowbridge (Seattle), Sea of Ferns (Bloedel), 2019, oil on paper, 22 ” x 30″, Courtesy of the Artist, kimberlytrowbridge.com, @kimberly_trowbridge

Shu-Ju Wang (Portland, OR), Water, 2014, meandering book structure, silkscreen (Print Gocco), gouache, color pencils, letterpress by Diane Jacobs, text: two poems by Emily Newberry, #31 of 40, 5.375″h x 5.25″w closed; 21.5″h x 25″w open, photo credit: Bill Bachhuber, Cynthia Sears Collection of Artists Books

Nancy Callan and Katherine Gray, The Dreamer, 2018, blown and sculpted glass with enamels, 13”h x 8”w x 8”d, Courtesy of the Artists

Trimpin, Hear & Now, Mixed media sound installation on antique hand-built cart

Image carousel of installation process for Michaelle Kumata’s Song for Generations in BIMA’s Beacon Window

Have yourself a merry & musical holiday season! ☃️

As a gift to you and yours, the BIMA team has put together a mix tape of some of our favorite comforting tunes to keep you warm & cozy all winter long.

Grab a cup of hot cocoa, snuggle under a blanket, and enjoy!

From all of us at BIMA, here’s to a happy 2021!

Listen on Spotify or on YouTube.

BIMA Staff Mix Tape 2020

BIMA & Hiatus: Midsummer by Audrey Nelson

BIMA is excited to announce a new partnership with Hiatus Magazine, an online compilation of quarantined teenagers’ most creative works. On BIMA’s social media, we will be featuring pieces from Hiatus’ spring 2020 issue featuring works by their teenage contributors created and imagined while sheltering at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Any written works will appear here on BIMA’s blog for you to read in its entirety! You can also see all the works from Hiatus’ most recent issue on their website here.

Now on to today’s featured work!

——

Midsummer by Audrey Nelson

your silence right now is deafening
we are screaming in the streets
as you post your drinks by the pool and throwbacks to last years vacation
we will remember your silence
in a time when all voices were called
to rise up
to demand action
your silence rang out
slicing like a battle cry
through our calls
no justice no peace
your silence sharp and pointed
lodging itself in the barrier
protecting the oppressors
pushing us back
no justice no peace
your silence is heavy
we are carrying the weight of their names
saying their names
as your silence drags us further down
no justice no peace
we will remember your silence
as our souls bleed and our feet blister
we’ll march through the streets
and remember your silence

——

Be sure to follow Hiatus Magazine at their Instagram and check out all the work on their website here.

BIMA & Hiatus: Silence by Bayla Rosenkotz

BIMA is excited to announce a new partnership with Hiatus Magazine, an online compilation of quarantined teenagers’ most creative works. On BIMA’s social media, we will be featuring pieces from Hiatus’ spring 2020 issue featuring works by their teenage contributors created and imagined while sheltering at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Any written works will appear here on BIMA’s blog for you to read in its entirety! You can also see all the works from Hiatus’ most recent issue on their website here.

Now on to today’s featured work!

——

Silence by Bayla Rosenkotz

your silence right now is deafening
we are screaming in the streets
as you post your drinks by the pool and throwbacks to last years vacation
we will remember your silence
in a time when all voices were called
to rise up
to demand action
your silence rang out
slicing like a battle cry
through our calls
no justice no peace
your silence sharp and pointed
lodging itself in the barrier
protecting the oppressors
pushing us back
no justice no peace
your silence is heavy
we are carrying the weight of their names
saying their names
as your silence drags us further down
no justice no peace
we will remember your silence
as our souls bleed and our feet blister
we’ll march through the streets
and remember your silence

——

Be sure to follow Hiatus Magazine at their Instagram and check out all the work on their website here.

Transgender Day of Remembrance 2020 – A Note

BIMA has had the privilege of being the site for Bainbridge Pride and Kitsap Pride Network’s annual event observing Transgender Day of Remembrance. As we cannot gather in person this year to remember the transgender lives lost this year, we asked Eve Palay, trans community member and representative for Bainbridge Pride, Rainbow Crew NW, and Jefferson County Transgender Support Group, for any thoughts or reflections she might wish to share with our community, along with a list of resources which can be found at the bottom of this page. We are grateful to Eve for her time and effort taken to allow all of us to share in this moment of remembrance.

In observing Transgender Day of Remembrance for years past, we usually hand-write cards with the names of transgender people murdered in the last year and then hand them out at our ceremony. We like to hand one card per person so that the reader gets to connect to the name and the cause of death on the card. Sometimes a reader may hold on to the card and the name for a long time, perhaps pinning it to a bulletin board by their desk.

When my friend, the Rev. Erin Grayson, was helping me cut and paste over three hundred cards, she sat back for a moment and asked, “Doesn’t it get to you, all these deaths?” I had to stop for a moment, and then I told her, no, I actually didn’t concentrate on the deaths. To me, I am overwhelmed by having the gift of these names in the first place. Twenty years or so ago, there was no list at all. Just think of the people who have brought these names from around the world to us.

We of the trans community want to share this gift. I learned when attending my first Transgender Day of Remembrance ceremony that we are sharing the gift of welcoming the spirits of these people who had so little welcome in their lives. And honestly, trans or not, we all know people like that.

The list is long and brutal—351 people this year alone. Sex workers and people of color are prominent, and most of the recorded deaths come from Central and South America. Please keep in mind that there is so much of the world that does not record trans deaths at all. After all, around the globe, trans sex workers are the least of us.

We have had a lot of support from the faith community over the years, and as we cannot have our usual gathering, we asked if churches and temples would like to share this gift in their services this month. We were pleased with the response we received. We did not want to take up their entire service, so the idea was to give them ten names to read. It turned out to be impossible to select just ten names from the list, so we gave them a choice of three lists, each with ten different names.

Our selected lists included Black and Latinx people, sex workers, and activists. Additionally, we included more victims from the Western world to underscore that this is not just a problem elsewhere. Still, these short lists are just a shadow of the whole list, just as the whole list is a shadow of what really goes on around the world. But it is not the number or the completeness that matters. Our hope is that you will find just one name that will connect with you, one spirit that can welcome as part of your own.

That is what we share. That is our measure of success.

– Eve Palay
Bainbridge Pride, Rainbow Crew NW, and Jeffferson County Transgender Support Group

BIMA has been provided a short list of names to honor and remember during Transgender Day of Remembrance this year. We invite you to take a moment of your day to sit with this list and remember these lives, and many others, that have been taken from us too soon.

Name: Hamsa, #12
Age: Not reported
Date of Death: Oct 13, 2019
Location: Hyderabad (India)
Cause of death: Burned
Remarks: They stumbled, their head was trampled, they were killed with kicks, sticks & stones.

Name: Brianna “BB” Hill, #17
Age: 30
Date of Death: October 16, 2019
Location: Kansas City (USA)
Remarks: Hill, 30, shot by a man who is currently in custody, was pronounced dead
when officers arrived on the scene. Kansas City Police Capt. Tim Hernandez told local press that the alleged shooter remained at the scene until they arrived.

Name: Chicho Chirinos, #21
Age: 49
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of Death: October 26, 2019
Location: La Plata (Argentina)
Cause of death: Stabbed
Remarks: The killer attacked from behind, kicked her and stabbed her again. The victim fell to the ground, but the killer continued to stab her with the knife several more times.

Name: Daphine Kauane, #32
Age: 15
Date of death: November 11, 2019
Location: Recife (Brazil)
Cause of death: Stoned

Name: Victoria Pineda, #37
Age: 28
Occupation: Activist/movement leader
Date of Death: November 16, 2019
Location: Departamento de Ahuachapán (El Salvador)
Cause of death: Beaten
Remarks: Victoria’s body was found naked, with her hands open as a symbol of crucifixion, holding some logs and a car tire on her head as a “crown of thorns” and her face disfigured due to stone blows

Name: Nikki Kuhnhausen, #56
Age: 17
Date of death: December 18, 2019
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Cause of death: Strangled/hanged
Remarks: Nikki Kuhnhausen, then 17, was reported missing on June 6. On Dec. 7, a hiker found her skull in the woods near Larch Mountain,

Name: Julie Berman, #63
Age: 51
Date of death: December 22, 2019
Location: Toronto (Canada)
Cause of death: Beaten
Remarks: Police said two people were inside the home when they arrived on scene and a female victim was found suffering from serious injuries.

Name: Mia Perry, #66
Age: 26
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of death: December 29, 2019
Location: Washington DC (USA)
Cause of death: shot
Remarks: A DC transgender woman was shot to death by, apparently, armed members of a private security company in a vacant apartment building, but there is still a lot of speculation about the case

Name: Dustin Parker, #68
Age: 25
Date of death: January 1, 2020
Location of death: Oklahoma City (USA)
Cause of death: Shot
Remarks: Dustin Parker, a 25-year-old transgender man, was fatally shot in
McAlester, Oklahoma, early on New Year’s Day. He was killed while working as a taxi cab driver.

Name: Nare Mphela, #69
Age: 27
Occupation: Activist/movement leader
Date of death: January 1, 2020
Location: Limpopo (South Africa)
Cause of death: Stabbed
Remarks: Nare Mphela, who won a landmark transgender discrimination case against her Limpopo high school in 2017, was stabbed to death in her home.

Name: Tamara, #83
Age: 24
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of death: January 13, 2020
Location: Saint-Petersburg (Russia)
Cause of death: Decapitated/dismembered
Remarks: The body of the deceased was found in the Mga River by an eleventh grader. Experts noted that the victim’s legs were carefully severed with a saw, and the soft tissues were cut off with a knife. The body was in the water for about six months.

Name: Ajita Bhujel, #92
Age: 29
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of death: January 18, 2020
Location: Kathmandu (Nepal)
Cause of death: Strangled/hanged
Remarks: Ajita’s body was found on the side of the road. She was raped, struck on the head with a blunt object and strangled. Her gold necklace and mobile phone were stolen. The motive of her death is unclear, however hate crime is not being ruled out

Name: Mari de Bastos Lima, #100
Age: 37
Date of death: January 27, 2020
Location: Santo Antônio do Leverger (Brazil)
Cause of death: Tortured
Remarks: The victim was buried alive

Name: Jessyca Sarmiento, #127
Age: 38
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of death: February 21, 2020
Location: Paris (France)
Cause of death: Run-over by car
Remarks: Jessyca was deliberately run over in a hit and run attack

Name: Monika Diamond, #152
Age: 34
Occupation: Owner of beauty shop/hair salon/bar/shop
Date of death: March 18, 2020
Location of death: Charlotte (USA)
Cause of death: Shot
Remarks: Monika was shot dead in an ambulance. Charlotte police and paramedics responded to a call about a disturbance in Days Inn where Monika was experiencing shortness of breath. When she was in the ambulance, the murderer, who was denied his entry, came back and shot her several times

Name: Musa, #169
Age: 15
Date of death: April 4, 2020
Location: Faisalabad (Pakistan)
Cause of death: Beaten
Remarks: She was ‘lured’ away by ‘local thugs’, physically and sexually abused and then murdered. Her body was left outside her mentor’s home.

Name: Johanna Metzger, #176
Age: 25
Occupation: Artist
Date of death: April 11, 2020
Location: Baltimore (USA)
Cause of death: Stabbed
Remarks: Johanna Metzger’s life was tragically lost in Baltimore, MD on April 14, 2020, after a stabbing on April 11. She was a self-taught musician of multiple instruments. A virtual vigil was held on Zoom

Name: Penelope Diaz Ramirez, #180
Age: 31
Date of death: May 13, 2020
Location: Bayamon (Puerto Rico)
Cause of death: Aphyxiation/smoke inhalation/suffocated
Remarks: Penelope was found hanging in a cell within the Bayamón correctional complex. Another inmate confessed that he used a piece of cloth to strangle her and then destroyed the evidence

Name: Helle Jae O’Regan, #200
Age: 20
Occupation: Hair dresser/stylist/beautician
Date of death: May 6, 2020
Location: San Antonio, Texas (USA)
Cause of death: stabbed
Remarks: Transgender hair stylist Helle Jae O’Regan was killed in an attack on a barbershop preparing to reopen in San Antonio, Texas. The killer choked her until she passed out and then stabbed her to death. Two other employees managed to escape

Name: Tony McDade, #215
Age: 38
Date of death: May 27, 2020
Location: Tallahassee (USA)
Cause of death: Shot
Remarks: The 38-year-old African-American transgender man, Tony McDade, was fatally shot in the Leon Arms apartment complex by an officer of the Tallahassee Police Department.

Name: Selena Reyes-Hernandez, #220
Age: 37
Date of death: May 31, 2020
Location: Chicago (USA)
Cause of death: Shot
Remarks: She was shot to death inside her home in Chicago because she told her assailant she was trans.

Name: Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells, #227
Age: 27
Date of death: June 6, 2020
Location: Philadelphia (USA)
Cause of death: Decapitated/dismembered
Remarks: Fell’s mutilated body was recovered from the Schuylkill river on June 9. Her body was stuffed into a suitcase with both legs severed, with stab wounds and evidence of trauma to the face and head.

Name: Essi Granlund, #229
Age: 26
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of death: June 12, 2020
Location: Vantaa (Finland)
Cause of death: Stabbed
Remarks: Essi was stabbed with a kitchen knife. The police failed to report her killing for over a month. When they finally did, they described the attack as “an argument between two men”.

#Name: Brayla Stone, #240
Age: 17
Occupation: Artist
Date of death: June 25, 2020
Location of death: Little Rock (USA)
Cause of death: Shot
Remarks: The body of Brayla Stone was found in a car on a walking path in the Little Rock suburb of Sherwood

Name: Summer Taylor, #255
Age: 24
Occupation: Employee/clerk/civil servant
Date of death: July 4, 2020
Location: Seattle, Washington (USA)
Cause of death: Run-over by car
Remarks: Summer Taylor, protester killed in Seattle, honored for ‘standing up for black lives’

Name: Manuela de Cassia, #268
Age: 48
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of death: July 20, 2020
Location of death: Milan (Italy)
Cause of death: Stabbed
Remarks: The victim was stabbed 80 times

Name: Exón Vélez, #227
Age: not reported
Date of death: July 26, 2020
Location: Provincia de los Ríos (Ecuador)
Cause of death: Stabbed
Remarks: Exón, a non-binary person, was murdered along with their partner with machete blows

Name: Aja Raquell Rhone-Spears, #278
Age: 32
Date of death: July 29, 2020
Location: Portland (USA)
Cause of death: Stabbed
Remarks: Aja Raquell Rhone-Spears, 32, was stabbed at a vigil for another homicide victim, Tyrell Penney, in Portland. A second person, whose identity has not been released, was also stabbed.

Name: Britani Jacqueline, #313
Age: not reported
Date of death: August 26, 2020
Location: Jalisco (Mexico)
Cause of death: not reported
Remarks: Britani was detained by four municipal police officers and was later found dead. It is believed that it was an extrajudicial execution

Name: A. V., #341
Age: 24
Occupation: Sex worker
Date of death: September 20, 2020
Location: Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)
Cause of death: Run-over by car
Remarks: A young trans woman was run over and killed after having a fight with a client. Prior to the event, the assailant had communicated to another trans sex worker his intention to murder a trans girl

Resources:

BIMA & Hiatus: Dear William, by anonymous

BIMA is excited to announce a new partnership with Hiatus Magazine, an online compilation of quarantined teenagers’ most creative works. On BIMA’s social media, we will be featuring pieces from Hiatus’ spring 2020 issue featuring works by their teenage contributors created and imagined while sheltering at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Any written works will appear here on BIMA’s blog for you to read in its entirety! You can also see all the works from Hiatus’ most recent issue on their website here.

Now on to today’s featured work!

——

Dear William by anonymous

I’m glad I discovered you. I’m thrilled to connect with you. I’m excited I found you. We hope that you and your loved ones are doing well during these uncertain times. I hope this finds you safe and well. I hope to find you and your family safe and healthy. A motivated student like you has a bright future ahead. You know you have what it takes to become a leader someday, right? We believe in you. Congratulations on your impressive test scores. Are you a go-getter, William? William, are you ready to say hello to the most challenging and rewarding years of your life? Let your light shine, William.

Never again will you receive so many glossy brochures, booklets, and posters—this is, alas, the price you pay for being a bright student. Baby chicks are more than small, cute balls of fluff. In fact, baby chicks exhibit altruism by making special chirps while feeding, calls that alert nearby chicks (likely relations who share many genes) that “dinner’s on!” Climate change is already impacting communities around the world. Your journey has begun. Start becoming your best. Master the art of juggling. Or physics. Or philosophy. Education with a view. Find yourself in the sun.

With a community built around strong connections between students and professors, we facilitate learning at the highest level. Our size means each student gets more attention from each professor. It’s rare to find a selective liberal arts college in a city. But you can discover that perfect combination right here. Our location enables students to grow intellectually through practical experiences in internships and research. We’re here to connect you with all the incredible site-based learning opportunities our unique location provides. World-class academic programs. We offer 200+ majors. Here you’ll find top-notch academics, hands-on learning and once-in-a-lifetime undergraduate research opportunities. There are thousands of courses, endless combinations of majors, no required subjects.

What if you could graduate debt-free? We meet 100% of demonstrated financial need. Excellence can be affordable. Competitive financial support. Affordable—for everyone. Our new, expanded financial aid program. One of the most generous need-based financial aid programs in the country.

Please be sure to verify your contact information. Please don’t hesitate to reach out. Please feel free to give us a call. Please know that we are here to help in any way we can. Please check out our prospective students’ page. Please fill out the form here. Please provide your parents’ contact information. Please stay connected by joining our mailing list. Please confirm. Please find. Please click, please join, please take, please. Please please please please. For God’s sake, please.

——

Be sure to follow Hiatus Magazine at their Instagram and check out all the work on their website here.

Día de los Muertos Tuesday Night Film Picks

In the spirit of our Tuesday night films & dinners, we’ve put together a short list of films to watch and celebrate Día de los Muertos.

See our full lineup events happening from our 2020 Día de los Muertos celebration here!

—-

The Book of Life
The Book of Life is a refreshingly original animated film that takes viewers to the underworld and back. This is a beautifully animated film that combines essential Mexican folklore, ancient mythology, and pop culture. It’s also an invitation to explore and learn more about other traditions and beliefs, from the Day of the Dead celebrations to legendary creatures like Chupacabras.
Available on Amazon Prime

Coco
Coco is a vibrant Disney/Pixar film that explores the traditions of the Day of the Dead, a child’s desire to become a musician despite his family’s wishes, and the power of unconditional love. Told from the point of view of Miguel (voiced by Anthony Gonzalez), a young boy who ends up in the Land of the Dead, the movie—which features an all-star Latinx voice cast (including Gael García Bernal and Benjamin Bratt), as well as a Latinx co-director and many Latinx crew members—is a tribute to Mexican traditions and customs. It also has powerful themes of perseverance, teamwork, and gratitude and encourages audiences to love and appreciate their family and always follow their dreams.
Available on Netflix

Roma
This drama, in Spanish and Mixtec (a native dialect used in some parts of Mexico) with English subtitles, from Oscar-winning director Alfonso Cuaron, tells the story of a maid and the troubled family she lives with, circa 1971-1972. It’s a gorgeous, moving masterpiece.
Available on Netflix

Macario
Three mysterious deities visit impoverished peasant Macario (Ignacio López Tarso) when his wife (Pina Pellicer) prepares for him his favorite meal, a whole turkey. After withholding the succulent bird from both God (José Luis Jiménez) and the Devil (José Gálvez), Macario finally offers half to Death (Enrique Lucero), hoping the gesture will stave off his own demise. As a reward, Death offers Macario healing water that will work only at the discretion of Death himself.
Available on YouTube

Hasta los Huesos
A dead man follows the path from his burial site to the underworld, where he is refused  until he embraces his own death in this short animated film from 2002.
Available on YouTube

Within/Earshot Jazz Festival 2020 wrap up!

This year, BIMA took the Within/Earshot Jazz Festival to places it has never been before—both figuratively and literally! For the first time, Within/Earshot was offered for free and presented digitally, allowing households across the globe to tune in. People from all over “visited” BIMA, streamed concerts, lectures, and programs all month long, allowing the museum to continue to produce meaningful and compelling digital programs throughout the lockdown and beyond.

Within/Earshot 2020 streamed from BIMA’s galleries, presenting concerts featuring some of the freshest, most exciting jazz voices in our region surrounded by the incredible art from BIMA’s Fiber 2020 exhibition. The best part about this online jazz festival? All of the concerts are available to watch (or rewatch) anytime you want! Check out each concert here:

The festival also traveled off-site to Seattle to visit Jazz Alley and Washington Hall for lively conversations about jazz with musician Marina Albero, John Bishop (Founder of Origin Records), Carol Handley (Music Director at KNKX), Brian Kirk (Professor of Jazz Studies, Seattle Central), Rob Perry (Jazz Alley), and Amanda Wilde (KUOW’s “The Swing Years”), and artist Zia Gipson presented an interactive art workshop on improv & abstraction. Most of these presentations are also available to revisit anytime you’d like:

We would also like to extend enormous gratitude to our sponsors for supporting Within/Earshot so enthusiastically and so faithfully: Thank you, Realogics/Sotheby’s, City of Bainbridge Island, KNKX 88.5, and Steve Davis for championing jazz music and making this year’s festival possible. We would also like to thank all of this year’s be-masked and be-shielded staff and participants for diving into music, art, and conversation with such heart and generosity, and for doing so with safety in mind. Within/Earshot was rich, compelling, and fun, and it was safely produced and presented and we could not have done it without your diligence: thank you.

This is an important time in the world and it is an important time for art, so thank you for connecting with us and for keeping art in your hearts. We sure miss you! BIMA will continue to roll with the punches, creating programs and adapting them to the evolving world we live in. We look forward to doing so with ingenuity, imagination, and with the belief that we will all be together again soon.

Onward!

 

Within/Earshot Jazz Fest 2020 artists talk inspiration

For this year’s Within/Earshot Jazz Festival, we asked artists from the lineup and some that have performed at BIMA in the past about what inspires them. Check out what some of this year’s artists said below!

Be sure to check out the lineup for this year’s festival for links to watch all the concerts and events even after they’ve happened!

Jacqueline Tabor

In February of 2020, I had the pleasure of performing at Fredrick Holmes Gallery in celebration of Black History month where I had the opportunity to collaborate with the brilliant Kenneth Moore. When I saw the first image I fell I love with his artistic perspective. It was warm, strong, gentle, brave, and consistently used an image that looked like me. Not me personally, but a positive image of a black person. His entire collection is a journey of life and love and if I had the ability it would be the on every wall in my home That evening I got to me Kenneth Moore a quiet and loving spirit who brought his family from Los Angeles. I was nervous and wanted to make him proud in a profound and ancestral way that I cannot explain. We hugged at the end of the evening and to this day we are in contact.

Kenneth Moore inspires me to see the beauty in me and that my American History contains more than just pain but hope. His shapes and color choices feel like I am looking at a mirror and for once I can see the beauty within myself. This artist has helped me have the courage to explore music that is less conventional and contains messages that are prevalent to today’s environment. Once this Pandemic is over, we are hoping to work together someway somehow.

Jean Chaumont

I was focused, taking advantage of my new surroundings, out of my Parisian bubble, to finally compose for my first personal jazz album. It had been three years and I was seeing the end of the creative tunnel, the project was taking life with a precise story and a musical direction. Writing all this music meant isolation and so when a little group of local artists invited me for an informal evening gathering it felt like a breath of fresh air. It took place in Emily Nelms Perez’s art studio, in Hamilton, NJ at the time. A couch, few folding chairs, and an improvised table hosting delicious appetizers that everyone brought to share. As the evening progressed each of us briefly introduced some of our current work in progress.

Sharing this moment was precious as everyone’s work was beautiful. It was exciting to witness the genesis of each piece and imagine their potential. Emily’s work was medium defying and thought-provoking. Each piece resonated with me. One, in particular, an astounding sculpture blending an imaginary white crow with two human hands as feathers. The hands seem like in an upside-down prayer pose. My mind was trying to grasp what this piece she named originally “A Broken Culture” meant for me. It felt provocative, yet visually pleasing, beautiful but slightly haunting. Emily had also difficulties to pinpoint the meaning of her work. When asked, she admitted that the sculpture’s meaning had evolved over the years. Each caption draft she wrote for it seemed influenced by her current life events. At that time she thought the work reflected humanity’s broken condition as a fallen people and the notion that human influence in the natural world is often destructive.

I asked her if she could photograph her sculpture, and that the photography would then become the album’s cover. She said yes and that’s how we collaborated on this project.

Evan Flory-Barnes

I truly believe and feel that all of the arts inform and influence each other each other in some way shape or form. So much of my work is inspired by relationships, places and what is affectionately known as “the hang”.  Which in essence is the informal spirit and the creativity that is birthed from it. I think of the friendship of Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso. Two giants of 20th century, each of whom created work that was a standard of excellence, influence and evolution. The two would send each other small little pieces of art to one another in the mail. I think of the Gustav Klimt and the Viennese cafe scene, where he knew Richard Strauss, Gustav Mahler, Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Klimt inspired these composers and many artists through his work. I think of  “Les Mardistes a salon of elite in artist in Paris which included Edouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas, and occasionally Claude Monet. Composer Claude Debussy would also join the group. I draw so much inspiration from the idea of all of these unique artists being in the same place at the same time, hanging, talking and musing with one another. When I think about it, this idea is one of chief inspirations for me and has been for a long time.

One of the most influential pairings of art and music has to be the iconic photography of Francis Wolff. The photographs from the Blue Note recording sessions of the 50’s 60’s capture the era completely while being timeless. Each artists is captured in this informal cool, dressed down hipness. The photos beautifully convey the magic that came out of those Blue Note recordings. The pictures and music an essential influence.